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Seaweed Health Foundation / News / Guardian reports plastic contamination in the oceans Guardian reports plastic contamination in the oceans

Monday 16 October 2017

In September the Guardian highlighted the environmental cost of plastics, and ocean pollution from plastics is indeed a problem even on the most remote and pristine shores.

The Seaweed Health Foundation's response is here.

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/sep/06/plastic-fibres-found-tap-water-around-world-study-reveals

https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/sep/08/sea-salt-around-world-contaminated-by-plastic-studies

Seaweed Health Foundation response

This aspect of seaweed production is addressed within the Nutritious Food Seaweed quality assurance scheme and standard, which was introduced by the Biodynamic Association in 2016.

The first producer to be certified was Seagreens®, and a number of procedures in their production, from site selection to processing and analysis, ensure that all Seagreens ingredients and finished products are free from contamination including plastics.

Every harvested batch is independently analysed for the presence of possible contaminant residues and allergens including PCBs, Dioxins, Furans an so on. The Nutritious Food Seaweed standard also monitors key nutrient markers to ensure the nutritional quality of the seaweed.

Nutritional profiles are provided at this Seagreens webpage.

No existing certification achieves this for consumers or producers. Neither the food safety regulations nor niche certification like Organic or British Retail Consortium go anywhere near analysing the composition of foods. A lot is taken for granted. Stormcast seaweed collected on the beach can be Organic - dead or denutrified.

This development of a production standard for seaweeds is important because we believe in particular that the British Isles and Nordic region have enormous potential to provide world class seaweed of great benefit to public health as well as their economies.

But most importantly of all, it requires that we keep the oceans clean, which starts with our personal choices of clothing materials, washing machines and waste water. Ultimately, like our feeedom, we must be prepared to pay the price to protect the world we inhabit.